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Improving sex – better knowledge about sexual anatomy and delaying ejaculation

Improving sex – better knowledge about sexual anatomy and delaying ejaculation


The Male Organs

The penis is suspended from the bony part of the pelvis and its major functions are to discharge urine from the bladder and to deposit the seminal fluid in the female genital tract. It consists of a body and head (glans). The glans, as in the clitoris, is covered with a prepuce or foreskin which is removed when circumcision is performed. This foreskin, too, should be pushed back regularly for thorough cleansing.

The penis, extremely sensitive to the touch, hangs loosely in front of the scrotum, a pouch which holds the testes. When not erect, the penis is about three and a half inches long, although here again, there is a great range of normal variation. When it becomes rigid during erection, of course, its length and thickness increase considerably. Anatomy.

Most of the seminal fluid consists of secretions from the sex glands, the prostate and the seminal vesicles. The important element in the seminal fluid is sperm, or spermatozoa, of which there are normally two hundred million in the teaspoon of seminal fluid ejaculated at each intercourse.

The testes are male sex glands oval in shape, about one and a half inches long and one inch thick. They are contained in the scrotum. The sperm travels from the testes towards the penis through a long coiled tube called the epididymis, which lies alongside the testes. In the epididymis, spermatozoa undergo a gradual process of maturation.

This tube becomes the spermatic duct, or vas, which curves upward in the scrotum and, passing behind the bladder, leads into the urethra. The seminal vesicles are connected with it and produce a gelatin-like secretion which mixes with the spermatozoa as they pass into the urethra at ejaculation.

The prostate, a gland shaped somewhat like horse chestnut, is located in front of the rectum and below the bladder,  surrounds the urethra to which it is connected by a duct. When ejaculation occurs, the prostate contracts and adds to the seminal fluid its milky secretion. The exact function of is secretion is not fully understood, but it is believed that it contains a substance which helps to liquefy the gelatinous fluid after ejaculation.

Under the microscope, spermatozoa look like tiny tadpoles, consisting of a head, middle section and tail. In the head and the middle section is the chromosomes and genes which characteristics of the child that are inherited from the father. A sperm cell travels about an inch in eight minutes in the female genital tract in search of the mature egg cell.

Of course, the whole point of sex is to fertilize the egg, but we should not lose sight of the fact that sex is fun. This is a point which needs to be stressed to young people when they receive sex education. And other things that need to be talked about are how young men can control themselves during intercourse so that they know how to slow down or delay ejaculation. Another contentious but very real subject is how to educate girls and women about how to reach orgasm. Educating young people on these basic issues of sex will lead to much greater harmony in marriage and relationships.

There may be slight physical pain at the outset of sexual activity. However, this usually subsides in a short time. I say usually. By that, I mean in the overwhelming percentage of cases. Very often, when women complain of pain long after they have been having sex, this may be due to an unnoticed chronic infection which yields readily to treatment. If there is no infection, then the pain may have a psychic rather than a physical basis. The woman may quite simply not enjoy intercourse. Without enjoyment, the muscles surrounding the vagina not only do not relax but may even go into spasm. Penetration by the penis against such spasm can be intensely painful.

I would urge such a woman to have a physical check-up. If nothing of importance is detected, the next step for such a woman is to seek, with the help of a competent therapist, an emotional basis for her problem.

I know a woman who experienced this type of muscular contraction or genital spasm. When she finally sought help, her emotional difficulties came clearly into focus, and she admitted to herself that she was afraid to have intercourse for two reasons. First, she feared childbirth, and second, she feared that if she used a contraceptive she would develop cancer.

Painstaking explanation of the facts plus emotional support by her physician finally convinced her that she could face pregnancy without fear when she was ready for it. She also accepted his reassurance that modern medical contraceptive as listed by the Family Planning Association have not been found to cause cancer.

Genital Organ Disproportion. This accounts for such a very minor number of sexual failures among married couples that I believe this fact needs re-emphasizing. I know of wives who are so convinced that their husbands’ penises are oversized that they are wary of intercourse.

This has led to unhappy times for these couples. The fact of the matter is that few husbands and wives are mismatched organically, if for no other reason than that most of the people in this country have genital development falling within the normal size range. Furthermore, women should remember that the vagina is capable of great stretching—even to be able to accommodate the passage of an eight- to ten-pound baby!

Climax and Conception

As I’ve mentioned, males reach the point of orgasm more readily than females. One wife I spoke to not long ago believed that conception could not take place unless she too reached climax. And, the wife added, if the woman does not often reach climax, there must be something physically wrong.

Both notions are false. If conception could not take place without the woman reaching climax, there would be no pregnancies as the result of rape. As for the second notion, that climax is an index of physical well-being, there is no evidence that it is so. It takes time for most women to reach the climax as easily or as often as their husbands do. There is some evidence that at least a few women do not even desire to reach climax each time there is coitus.

At times, too, the man or his wife may indulge in some sort of exercise or leisure-time pursuit that causes physical stress in the lower portion of the body. A woman I know found that she could not bear intercourse for some appreciable time after horseback riding. Knowing this, she has adjusted her leisure habits somewhat.

In general, both husband and wife should learn the basics of physical comfort in intercourse. Lights, covers, room temperatures, size of the bed—all should be adjusted for greatest comfort. A certain amount of attention should be paid to position, but it should not be unduly emphasized. Although it is thought to be a key factor in marital love, the fact is that it is not.

The Impotent Male

A great deal has been said and written about the infertile male, much of it more than a little erroneous. It has been found by exhaustive studies that 5 per cent or fewer of all married men are infertile, with sperm counts too low to allow conception to take place.

Infertility does not mean impotence. Even if a man is infertile, he usually is entirely potent, that is, capable of normal intercourse. Infertility need bear no relationship to male genital size, sexual desire or ability to achieve an erection.

Impotence in the male is a special subject in itself, and in nearly every case the cause is psychic. The man who suffers from impotence should seek psychiatric help.

Strength of Sexual Desire

Many people believe that the gradations of sexual desire are controlled by physical factors only. Thus, a woman once said to me, “That young teen-ager is oversexed—her glands are the reason.” Or a young executive said not long ago, “I’m rather neutral about sex. I guess I’m under-developed physically.” Let me emphasize that physical factors as they relate to sexual desire are rare indeed. If an individual has great sex desires or less, the differential is almost always psychological and is caused by upbringing, teaching and experience. Furthermore, sexual desire shows considerable variation in the same individual at different times.

Here, perhaps more than in any other area, we are creatures of our conditioning. It is not possible to construct an exact pattern of upbringing sure to result in increased or decreased desire.

The Changing Social Picture

Animals during their mating season provide prime examples of sexual tensions. A male stag during the rutting season will run for miles seeking a female to court. For human beings, there are no such seasons. Powerful sexual drives are likely to hit and hit hard during that period following puberty when our young people are still in a stage of immaturity and financial dependency.

This is one of the prices we pay for living in our civilization. Unlike most primitive cultures where the age of sexual maturity more or less coincides with the age at which it is permissible to undertake sexual relationships, our civilization points its finger sternly and says, “No, you may not have sexual intercourse until you are married. And you may not marry until you can support a family by your efforts.” But the powerful sexual drives which reach their peaks between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two in males, and somewhat later in females, have caused changes in cultural patterns in other ways. 

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